2017 Arkansas Frogs and Toads Calendar now available

2017 Arkansas Frogs and Toads CalendarThe 2017 Arkansas Frogs and Toads Calendar is now available for a $10 donation.

  • Excellent images of Arkansas frogs, toads, tadpoles, and egg strings!
  • Each species call and season
  • Information about the citizen science frog monitoring program – FrogWatch USA
  • Phenology chart for all 23 Arkansas frog and toad species
  • Six images and descriptions of Endangered Species (NEW!)
  • Six images and descriptions of Invasive Species (NEW!)

2017 Arkansas Frogs and Toads CalendarWe printed just 200 of these calendars.

When they are gone, they are gone.

For more information and to get your calendar by PayPal or credit card,

CLICK HERE

Thank you for your support of Arkansas Frogs and Toads!



2016 Frog Calendar Available

2016 Arkansas Frogs and Toads Calendar

Frog CalendarThis 8½” by 11″ full-color frog calendar includes:

  • Full descriptions of 12 Arkansas species
  • Images taken by Arkansans
  • A chart of species calling times
  • Information about FrogWatch USA
  • Holidays and phases of the moon

 

 

This frog calendar is available for a $10 donation which includes shipping.

To order, go to http://www.arkansasfrogsandtoads.org/arkansas-frogs-toads-calendar


Frogs in Winter

Frogs in WinterFrogs in winter can be challenged

Ever wonder where the frogs and toads go in the winter?  They are “ectothermic” or cold-blooded animals that depend on the environment to maintain their body temperature.  So where do they hide to avoid being frozen solid in a place like this?

The answer depends on which species you are talking about.  And before we can address that, we need to describe what’s available in the winter environment.

Three choices for a winter home

There is water.  Water would do frogs absolutely no good if it froze solid, but water has the unusual property that ice floats on the surface.  It is less dense than the water it is floating on.  In fact, water becomes more dense as it cools down to 39.16° F.  Then it become less dense the colder it gets until it freezes at 32°.  That means that the temperature of the water at the bottom of a lake or pond will be 39.16° F because the most dense water will sink to that level.

There is earth.  The earth can become cold and freeze during cold weather, but only on the surface down to the frost line.  You see, the earth is a huge heat sink that is not easily frozen.  Below the frost line, the earth stays at a constant temperature – usually in the high 50° F range.

There is debris.  The forest floor is covered with leaves, rotting logs, rocks and stone.  Although these are not great insulators, they provide some protection from the wind and winter precipitation.

Frogs and toads in Arkansas hibernate in the winter.  Their metabolism is greatly reduced or shuts down completely during hibernation.  They find a place to “sleep” out the winter in a shelter called a “hibernaculum.”  So which frogs and toads select each type of shelter?

Where do individual species go?

American BullfrogAquatic Species – This includes the American Bullfrog, Green (Bronze) Frog, Pickerel Frog, and Southern Leopard Frog.  These four will dive down to the bottom of the pond, lake, or stream and settle in to the mud and silt for the winter.  The water and ice above them are great insulators against the winter.  They stop breathing with their lungs, and blood is increased to the permeable skin where oxygen is obtained directly from the cold water (“cutaneous respiration”).  Their legs are “spread eagle” to keep them in place.  Their second eyelids (nictitating membranes) are pulled up over their eyes which sink deep into their cranial cavities for protection.  They don’t get under the mud because there is not enough dissolved oxygen in it and they would suffocate.  Their hearts continue to pump a small amount of blood, but they don’t eat and spend the winter in a state of torpor.  By the way, Bullfrog and Green frog tadpoles will also over-winter at the bottom and fed on plant material and detritus (waste material).

Dwarf American ToadToads – This includes the Dwarf American, Fowler’s, Western and Eastern Narrow-mouthed toads, and the three Spadefoot species.  Toads will take advantage of the warm earth below the frost line by digging a burrow (or borrowing one from another animal).  Their metabolism cuts way back, but they continue to breathe and pump blood.  The Crawfish Frog also stays in a burrow all winter.  Unlike the aquatic frogs, these toads, spadefoots, and Crawfish Frog do not assume a “spread eagle” position, but keep their limbs close to their bodies.

 

Pseudacris FouquetteiTreefrogs – This includes the Bird-voiced, Cope’s, Gray, Green, Spring Peeper and Squirrel treefrogs, the Boreal, Cajun, Illinois, and Strecker’s chorus frogs, Blanchard’s Cricket Frog, and the Wood Frog (which is not a tree frog).  These frogs find hibernacula on the forest floor.  They pull their limbs in, protect their eyes, and shut down under leaf litter, in rotting logs, in a shallow burrow or in cracks and crevices of rocks.  Their bodies produce a kind of glucose antifreeze that keeps their vital organs from freezing, but in many cases their bodies appear to freeze solid – like frogsicles!  Wood Frogs in particular can exist in this mostly frozen state north of the Arctic Circle!  In the spring, these frogs thaw from the inside out.  Foxes like to scratch through the leaf litter in search of a frozen frog treat.

Don’t forget to obtain your 2015 Arkansas Frogs and Toads Wall Calendar here


Frog Calls on SoundCloud

Now you can listen to frog and toad calls from around the country on SoundCloud

Dwarf American Toad

Click here to go to http://soundcloud.com/frogwatch-usa

 

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERAAnd don’t forget to get your 2015 Arkansas Frogs and Toads Wall Calendar for $10 plus tax and shipping.

 

Click here for more calendar information